NAME
     epcf90 - Edinburgh Portable Compilers' Fortran 90 compiler
 
SYNOPSIS
     epcf90 [-1] [-132] [-72]
          [-arch={generic|native|mips1|mips2|R3000|R4000}]
          [-auto] [-bd,progname] [-c] [-cerrs] [-cl,file]
          [-cm] [-C] [-C90] [-CA] [-CB] [-CP] [-CS] [-CU]
          [-CV] [-d[n]] [-dalign] [-dryrun] [-Dname[=def]]
          [-DD] [-DX] [-DY] [-e] [-E] [-fast] [-F] [-F77]
          [-FI] [-FR] [-g] [-G[{1|2}]] [-help] [-i2] [-I2]
          [-i4] [-I4] [-ic] [-Idir] [-K pic] [-K PIC]
          [-mips2] [-native] [-nbs] [-nodalign] [-nus[,file]]
          [-o file] [-onetrip] [-O[1][3][5]] [-p] [-q]
          [-Q{f|as|crt|cc|ld}path] [-Qinstall prefix]
          [-Qoption {as|cc|cpp|ld} option] [-Qpath dir]
          [-r8] [-S] [-temp=dir] [-time] [-u] [-Uname]
          [-v] [-Vaxlib] [-w] [-w90] [-WB] [-y]  [files]
 
     {..} braces enclose alternatives separated by `|'. [..] brackets indi-
     cate an optional item.
 
     The effect of the options is described below. If no options are
     included the basic compilation sequence outlined below is followed.
 
     files is a list of the Fortran source files to be compiled, and any
     previously compiled object files or C or assembler source files which
     are to be included with them.
 
DESCRIPTION
     epcf90 is the EPC Fortran 90 compiler, which translates programs writ-
     ten in the Fortran 90 programming language into executable load
     modules or relocatable binary programs for subsequent linking by
     ld(1). In addition to implementing the ANSI Standard Fortran 90
     language, epcf90 supports commonly used Fortran 77 VAX extensions, Sun
     extensions, and many others.
 
     In addition to the many options (detailed below), epcf90 accepts
     several types of file. In detail, epcf90 recognizes the following suf-
     fixes attached to files:
 
          .a    Archive library
          .c    C source file
          .F    Fortran source file with C preprocessor directives
          .f    Fortran source file
          .for  Fortran source file
          .fv   Fortran source file
          .ftn  Fortran source file
          .f90  Fortran 90 source file
          .i    C source file output by the C preprocessor
          .o    Object file
          .S    Assembler source file with C preprocessor directives
 
 
 
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EPCF90(1)                  EPC (6 November 1996)                  EPCF90(1)
 
 
 
          .s    Assembler source file
 
 
     By default, Fortran source files ending with .F, .f, .for, .fv or .ftn
     are assumed to be in fixed format, and source files ending with suffix
     .f90 are assumed to be in free format. These defaults may be overrid-
     den by the compiler options -FR and -FI.
 
     In the basic compilation sequence, which will be followed if no com-
     piler options are specified, the compiler checks for errors in the
     source file in three passes. In the first pass, any syntax errors in
     the source are identified and semantic analysis of most non-executable
     statements is performed. In the second pass, semantic analysis of exe-
     cutable and residual non-executable statements is performed. In the
     third pass (storage allocation), equivalence errors are detected.
 
     An error detected in any pass does not stop that pass from being com-
     pleted, but will inhibit execution of the succeeding passes. The com-
     piler outputs any error, warning or comment messages to standard
     error, stderr.
 
     If C source files are to be compiled or if any of the options -D, -E,
     -F, -I or -U are to be used, a C compiler must be available on your
     system.  By default this is assumed to be the EPC ANSI C compiler with
     pathname
 
               /opt/epc/ecc/bin/ecc
 
     If this is not the pathname of the C compiler present on your system
     then the option -Qccpath must be used to specify the pathname. For
     example:
 
               -Qcc/usr/users/mydir/cc
 
     Files with a suffix of .F are first processed by the C preprocessor
     into a file in the current directory.  The output file from the C
     preprocessor has the same name as the source file but with the .F suf-
     fix substituted by .f. This file is then normally passed to the com-
     piler for compilation, and if the compilation is successful the inter-
     mediate output file is deleted.
 
     If no errors are found, the compiler generates an object file for each
     Fortran 90 source file specified to the compiler. For each C source
     file epcf90 invokes the C compiler, and for each assembler file it
     invokes the assembler.
 
     The compiled object files are then passed to the linker ld(1), which
     links them, together with any existing object files on the command
     line and any object files required to satisfy references to previously
     compiled modules, to produce the executable program. In addition,
     unless the option -ic was specified, the compilation system generates
     files related to the EPC Fortran Compilation Environment. This enables
 
 
 
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EPCF90(1)                  EPC (6 November 1996)                  EPCF90(1)
 
 
 
     any modules in the program to be made available for use by subsequent
     programs. The executable program is loaded into the file called a.out.
     The completed executable program is now ready to be run.
 
COMPILER OPTIONS
     There are many compiler options available, some of which are used if
     you do not want the usual compilation sequence, while others add extra
     facilities. The compiler passes to the linker any options which it
     does not recognize.
 
     Note that combining compiler options is not permitted: they must be
     given separately; e.g. -w -S cannot be specified as -wS.
 
     -1 or -onetrip
           Compiles DO loops to be performed at least once if reached (by
           default Fortran 90 DO loops are not performed at all if the
           upper limit is smaller than the lower limit).
 
     -132 or -e
           Allows fixed form source lines to contain up to 132 characters.
 
     -72   Issues a warning message if a non-comment statement in a fixed
           form source file extends into column 73 or beyond. By default,
           text in this region will be ignored unless option -132 or -e is
           selected.
 
     -arch={generic|native|mips1|mips2|R3000|R4000}
           Instructs the compiler to generate code for the nominated archi-
           tecture variant.  By default the compiler will generate instruc-
           tions that are available on all MIPS architectures; this is the
           effect of -arch=generic.  The options -arch=mips1 and
           -arch=R3000 are synonyms for -arch=generic.
 
           If -arch=mips2 is specified the compiler will generate code
           using the extended R4000 instruction set; such code will not run
           on R2000 or R3000 processors.  The option -arch=R4000 is a
           synonym for -arch=mips2.
 
           The option -arch=native directs the compiler to generate code
           using the instruction set available on the compile-time
           hardware.  It is equivalent to -arch=mips2 if the compiler is
           invoked on hardware that supports the extended R4000 instruction
           set; on all other platforms it is equivalent to -arch=generic.
 
     -auto Specifies that the run-time stack rather than static storage is
           to be used to hold locally declared variables. (Variables
           defined in a procedure are otherwise allocated to the stack only
           if they appear in an AUTOMATIC statement, or if the procedure is
           recursive and the variables do not have the SAVE or ALLOCATABLE
           attributes.)
 
     -bd,progname
 
 
 
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EPCF90(1)                  EPC (6 November 1996)                  EPCF90(1)
 
 
 
           Invokes the EPC binder to generate the list of objects required
           to construct a complete program, given the name of the main pro-
           gram unit (note, not the name of the file containing it). The
           list generated is then passed to the linker, ld(1).
 
     -c    Compiles but does not create an executable program. The compiled
           object file is put in a file with the suffix .o and is not
           passed to the linker. This option is useful for building up pro-
           grams from several separately compiled units, perhaps in dif-
           ferent languages.
 
     -cerrs
           Causes error and warning messages to be generated in a terse
           format, similar to that produced by the standard USL ANSI C com-
           piler cc:
 
                     "file", line no : error message
 
     -cl,file
           Specifies a program unit catalog list, which is a text file giv-
           ing the names of the program unit catalogs to be searched for
           modules referenced in the program in USE statements.
 
     -cm   Suppresses all comment messages.
 
     -C    Equivalent to: -CA -CB -CP -CS -CU -CV.
 
     -C90  Links in an alternative I/O library which supports mixed input
           and output with C on the standard streams.
 
     -CA   (Should be used in conjunction with -dn.)  Causes a check that,
           at run-time, references to pointers and to allocatable arrays
           are not NIL. See Section 1.3.1 of the EPC Fortran 90 User's
           Guide for further details.
 
     -CB   (Should be used in conjunction with -dn.)  Causes a check that,
           at run-time, subscript values are within array bounds.  It also
           checks that character substring references are within bounds.
           See Section 1.3.2 of the EPC Fortran 90 User's Guide for further
           details.
 
     -CP   (Should be used in conjunction with -dn.)  Causes a run-time
           error to be generated if a reference is made to an optional
           dummy argument that is not present.  See Section 1.3.5 of the
           EPC Fortran 90 User's Guide for further details.
 
     -CS   (Should be used in conjunction with -dn.)  Causes a check that,
           at run-time, the shapes of array arguments to intrinsic pro-
           cedures are consistent.  See Section 6.4 of the EPC Fortran 90
           User's Guide for details.
 
     -CU   (Should be used in conjunction with -dn.)  Causes an error at
 
 
 
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EPCF90(1)                  EPC (6 November 1996)                  EPCF90(1)
 
 
 
           run-time if variables are used before they are assigned a value.
           See Section 1.3.3 of the EPC Fortran 90 User's Guide for further
           details.
 
     -CV   (Should be used in conjunction with -dn.)  On entry to a subpro-
           gram, tests the correspondence between the actual arguments
           passed and the dummy arguments expected.  Both calling and
           called code must be compiled with -CV for the checks to be
           effective. See Section 1.3.4 of the EPC Fortran 90 User's Guide
           for further details.
 
     -d[n] Generates extra information needed to produce a list of current
           variables in a diagnostic report. See Chapter 7 of the EPC For-
           tran 90 User's Guide (on run-time diagnostics) for further
           details. Diagnostic reports are generated by the following:
 
           -  input/output errors
           -  invalid reference to a pointer or allocatable array (if -CA
              option selected)
           -  subscript out of bounds (if -CB option selected)
           -  invalid reference to an optional dummy argument that is not
              present (if -CP option selected)
           -  invalid array argument to an intrinsic procedure (if -CS
              option selected)
           -  use of unassigned variables (if -CU option selected)
           -  argument mismatch (if -CV option selected)
           -  invalid assigned labels
           -  call to the abort routine (see Chapter 9 of the EPC Fortran
              90 User's Guide)
           -  certain mathematical errors (see Section 6.5 of the EPC For-
              tran 90 User's Guide)
           -  errors reported by intrinsic procedures
           -  hardware detected errors
 
           n=0   (or n omitted) displays only the procedure name and the
                 number of the line at which the failure occurred.
           n=1   reports scalar variables local to program units currently
                 active.
           n=2   reports local and COMMON scalars
           n>2   reports the first n elements of local and COMMON arrays
                 and all scalars.
 
     -dalign
           It is possible, by the effects of COMMON or EQUIVALENCE state-
           ments, for a variable of type double precision to be aligned on
           a single word boundary rather than a double word boundary.  The
           compiler will report this situation by issuing the warning:
 
                "Alignment of [variable and location] may cause performance
                degradation"
 
           By default the compiler will assume that any double precision
 
 
 
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EPCF90(1)                  EPC (6 November 1996)                  EPCF90(1)
 
 
 
           variable that is either a dummy argument or a pointer target
           will be aligned on a single word boundary.  The -dalign option
           instructs the compiler to assume that such double precision
           variables will be aligned on double word boundaries.
 
     -dryrun
           Displays, but does not execute, the verbose form of compiler and
           linker command lines.
 
     -Dname=def or -Dname
           Defines name to the C preprocessor as if by a #define directive.
           If no definition is specified then name will be defined with the
           value `1'.
 
     -DD   Compiles fixed form lines with a D or a d in column 1; if this
           option is not set these lines are treated as comments.
 
     -DX   Compiles fixed form lines with an X (not an x) in column 1; if
           this option is not set these lines are treated as comments.
 
     -DY   Compiles fixed form lines with a Y (not a y) in column 1; if
           this option is not set these lines are treated as comments.
 
     -e or -132
           Allows fixed form source lines to contain up to 132 characters.
 
     -E    Passes .c, .F, and .S files through the C preprocessor only. In
           the absence of a -o option, the output is written to standard
           output. The source is not compiled or loaded.
 
     -fast This option is provided for convenience.  It is a synonym for
 
                     -O135 -dalign -arch=native
 
           These options may be overridden by also specifying any of the
           following, as appropriate, with -fast:
 
                     -nodalign
                     -O[1][3][5]
                     -arch={generic|mips2}
 
           The meanings of -O[1][3][5] and -nodalign are explained below.
 
     -F    Passes .c, .F, and .S files through the C preprocessor and the
           output is saved in a corresponding .i, .f, or .s file. This file
           is not compiled. The effect of
 
                     epcf90  -F  source.F  source.f
 
           is to compile and save a copy of the preprocessed file in
           source.f.
 
 
 
 
Page 6                       Reliant UNIX 5.43    Printed October 31, 1998
 
 
 
 
 
 
EPCF90(1)                  EPC (6 November 1996)                  EPCF90(1)
 
 
 
     -F77  Links in the SGI Fortran 77 library. -F77 automatically invokes
           -C90 (see above).
 
     -FI   Specifies that all the source code is in fixed format; this is
           the default except for files ending with the suffix .f90.
 
     -FR   Specifies that all the source code is in Fortran 90 free format;
           this is the default for files ending with the suffix .f90.
 
     -g    Generates the additional symbol table information required when
           using the interactive debugger edb.  See Chapter 8 of the EPC
           Fortran 90 User's Guide for further details.
 
     -G    Writes a listing of the source file to standard output, includ-
           ing any error or warning messages.  The errors and warnings are
           also output to standard error, stderr.
 
     -G1   Prints a listing of the source file with INCLUDE files expanded.
 
     -G2   Prints a listing of the source file showing code movement by the
           optimizer. This is only valid if the optimization option -O (any
           level) is also selected.
 
     -help Displays the options recognized and their usage.
 
     -i2   Specifies that all quantities of integer type and unspecified
           kind will occupy two bytes.  All quantities of logical type and
           unspecified kind will also occupy two bytes.
 
           All logical constants and all small integer constants occupy two
           bytes.
 
     -I2   Same as -i2.
 
     -i4   All integer and logical types of unspecified kind will occupy
           four bytes; this is the default.
 
     -I4   Same as -i4.
 
     -ic   Specifies an independent compilation, i.e. the EPC Fortran Com-
           pilation Environment is not accessed or updated. A MODULE or USE
           statement in the source will cause the compiler to generate an
           error.
 
     -Idir The C preprocessor searches for #include files whose names do
           not begin with `/' first in the directory of the source file,
           then in the directories identified via the -I option, then in
           the current working directory and finally in /usr/include. This
           option may be used more than once to specify additional direc-
           tories to search.
 
           In addition to use with the C preprocessor, -Idir can be used
 
 
 
Page 7                       Reliant UNIX 5.43    Printed October 31, 1998
 
 
 
 
 
 
EPCF90(1)                  EPC (6 November 1996)                  EPCF90(1)
 
 
 
           with the EPC Fortran 90 compiler. Files included by the Fortran
           INCLUDE statement are normally referenced in the same directory
           as the file being compiled. -Idir may be used to extend the
           search for an INCLUDE file into other directories.
 
     -K pic
           Generates code suitable to call position-independent code
           (default). See also -K PIC.
 
     -K PIC
           Generates position-independent code. This is normally used to
           create shared libraries.
 
     -mips2
           This option is a synonym for -arch=mips2.  Code is generated
           using the extended R4000 instruction set. Such code will not run
           on R2000 or R3000 processors.
 
     -native
           This option is a synonym for -arch=native.  It instructs the
           compiler to generate code using the instruction set of the
           compile-time hardware.
 
           By default the compiler will generate instructions that are
           available on all MIPS architectures, but if the compile-time
           platform supports the extended R4000 instruction set, the effect
           of -native will be the same as -mips2 (see above).
 
     -nbs  Treats backslash (\) as a normal graphic character.
 
           For compatibility with C usage, the backslash (\) is normally
           allowed in EPC Fortran 90 as an escape character. It denotes
           that the following character in the string has a significance
           which is not normally associated with the character. The effect
           is to ignore the backslash character, and either substitute an
           alternative value for the following character or to interpret
           the character as a quoted value.  The escape characters recog-
           nized, and their effect, are described in the table below.
 
           Escape Char    Effect
                \n        newline
                \t        horizontal tab
                \v        vertical tab
                \b        backspace
                \f        form feed
                \0        null
                \'        apostrophe (does not terminate a string)
                \"        double quote (does not terminate a string)
                \\        \
                \x        x, where x is any other character
 
 
 
 
 
Page 8                       Reliant UNIX 5.43    Printed October 31, 1998
 
 
 
 
 
 
EPCF90(1)                  EPC (6 November 1996)                  EPCF90(1)
 
 
 
           Thus:           'ISN\'T'
 
           is a valid string. The \ is not counted in the length of the
           string.
 
           The -nbs option specifies that backslash is to be regarded sim-
           ply as a graphic character, not an escape character.  This may
           be necessary when transferring programs from non-UNIX environ-
           ments, for example VAX/VMS.
 
     -nodalign
           This option is the inverse of -dalign and reaffirms the
           compiler's default which is to assume that a double precision
           variable which is either a dummy argument or a target of a
           pointer is not necessarily aligned on a double word boundary.
           See -dalign for further details.
 
     -nus or -nus,file
           Instructs the compiler not to append an underscore character (_)
           to each subprogram name which it records in the object file.  If
           this option is not selected, the compiler follows the normal
           practice of UNIX Fortran compilers, which is to append under-
           score characters.  This option may be required when interfacing
           Fortran routines to existing C code.
 
           If file is supplied, it should contain a list of subprogram
           names. In this case, only these subprogram names are recorded in
           the object file without an underscore appended; all other names
           are recorded with an underscore.
 
           Beware: use of this option will effectively render inaccessible
           the VAX/VMS utility and 3F library procedures unless an under-
           score is explicitly appended to each library procedure name in
           the Fortran source. The VAX/VMS utility and 3F library pro-
           cedures are described in Chapter 9 of the EPC Fortran 90 User's
           Guide.
 
     -o file
           Nominates an alternative name for the output file. Normally the
           output file will be the executable produced by the linker; this
           option would be used to override the default name of a.out.
 
           The option may also be used to specify the output file when
           using the -E option, but file must have the appropriate suffix
           for the file produced.
 
     -onetrip or -1
           Compiles DO loops to be performed at least once if reached (by
           default Fortran 90 DO loops are not performed at all if the
           upper limit is smaller than the lower limit).
 
     -O[1][3][5]
 
 
 
Page 9                       Reliant UNIX 5.43    Printed October 31, 1998
 
 
 
 
 
 
EPCF90(1)                  EPC (6 November 1996)                  EPCF90(1)
 
 
 
           Optimizes the generated code so that it executes faster but at
           the cost of some increase in compile time. The -O option is
           incompatible with the diagnostic options (-C, -CA, -CB, -CP, -
           CS, -CU, -CV, -g and -d), which provide run-time development
           facilities such as array-bound and unassigned variable checking.
 
           The optimizations fall into four groups, corresponding to the
           options -O, -O1, -O3 and -O5.
 
           The -O option includes a number of `primary' optimizations such
           as
 
           -  constant folding, where expressions are computed at compile
              time when possible.
           -  constant propagation, where such computed expressions are
              propagated to subsequent expressions and allow them in turn
              to be folded.
           -  common subexpression elimination, where a subexpression com-
              mon to several statements is computed at run-time only once.
           -  code hoisting, where invariant code in a loop is `hoisted'
              out of the loop.
           -  dead code elimination, where code that can never be executed
              is deleted, thus reducing the size of the executable file.
           -  strength reduction, where an expensive operation such as a
              multiply in a loop is replaced by an equivalent but cheaper
              operation such as an add.
           -  register allocation, where variables are selected to be
              retained in a register, depending on where and how often they
              are referenced in the current region of code.
 
           When -O1 is specified, optimizations are performed on the
           assumption that there is non-interference between actual argu-
           ments and common block variables.  This level of optimization is
           inappropriate where, for example, a variable passed as an argu-
           ment is also in a common block declared in the subprogram, so
           that the subprogram could access the variable in two ways under
           different names.
 
           When -O3 is specified, division by a real constant may be
           transformed into a multiply operation using its reciprocal, and
           references to certain transformational intrinsic procedures may
           be in-lined, to give faster execution.  These optimizations can
           give different results in numerically sensitive cases.
 
           When -O5 is specified, global instruction scheduling of the gen-
           erated code is to be carried out.  This involves the rearrange-
           ment of the code order and register allocation, to improve usage
           of the processor instruction pipeline.  Instructions may be
           moved between basic blocks or be executed speculatively during
           pipeline stall periods.
 
           Selecting any optimization automatically includes the -O
 
 
 
Page 10                      Reliant UNIX 5.43    Printed October 31, 1998
 
 
 
 
 
 
EPCF90(1)                  EPC (6 November 1996)                  EPCF90(1)
 
 
 
           optimizations.  Combinations of the above optimizations can be
           specified by combining the corresponding digits, e.g. -O15. See
           also -fast.
 
     -p    Compiles code for profiling the performance of the executable
           program with prof(1). If the object files are being linked, a
           profiled version of the Fortran library is searched.  When the
           executable program is run, the file mon.out is created in the
           current directory.  An execution profile can then be generated
           using prof.
 
     -q    Suppresses compiler output to standard error, stderr. When -q is
           specified in conjunction with -bd (see above) then only messages
           associated with fatal errors will be output to stderr by the EPC
           binder.
 
     -Qxpath
           Uses an alternative version of utility x found in path. path
           must be the absolute pathname of the utility x. x must be one
           of:
 
           f    for the EPC Fortran 90 compiler
           as   for the assembler
           crt  for the crt startup routine
           cc   for the C driver
           ld   for the linker
 
           For example:
 
               epcf90 -c -Qf$home/bin/mycompiler  t.f
 
           would compile t.f using the EPC Fortran 90 compiler in the file
           $home/bin/mycompiler.
 
     -Qinstall prefix
           The EPC Fortran 90 compiler release is installed in the direc-
           tory opt/epc, normally under the root directory, /.  If the
           release was not installed under / then the name of the host
           directory, prefix, must be specified by the -Qinstall option.
 
           For example, by specifying the prefix as $HOME, the complete
           installation can be held within the user's home directory.
 
     -Qoption utility option
           Passes the option option to the utility utility. utility may be
           one of
 
                          as   cpp
                          cc   ld
 
     -Qpath dir
           Inserts the directory dir at the front of the driver's search
 
 
 
Page 11                      Reliant UNIX 5.43    Printed October 31, 1998
 
 
 
 
 
 
EPCF90(1)                  EPC (6 November 1996)                  EPCF90(1)
 
 
 
           path; this directory will be searched first for all the compila-
           tion tools.
 
     -r8   Treats all floating point variables, constants, functions and
           intrinsics as double precision, and all complex variables, con-
           stants, functions and intrinsics as double complex.
 
     -S    Prints a pseudo assembly listing on standard output, stdout.
 
     -temp=dir
           Nominates an alternative directory for temporary files created
           by the driver.
 
     -time Reports execution times for the various compilation stages.
 
     -u    Makes the default type of a variable undefined rather than using
           the default Fortran rules.
 
     -Uname
           Removes any initial definition of name, where name is a reserved
           symbol predefined by the C preprocessor.
 
     -v    Outputs verbose form of compiler and linker command lines.
 
     -Vaxlib
           Links in EPC's VAX utility library in place of the 3F library.
           See Chapter 9 of the EPC Fortran 90 User's Guide for further
           details.
 
     -w    Suppresses all warning messages.
 
     -w90  Suppresses warning messages about non-standard Fortran 90
           features used.
 
     -WB   On a compile-time bound check violation, issues a warning
           instead of an error.  (This is to accommodate old Fortran code,
           in which array bounds of dummy arguments were frequently
           declared as 1.)
 
     -y    This option can be used to check the syntax of a source file
           without compiling it.  Any errors found are output in the normal
           way, but an object file is not produced.
 
ENVIRONMENT
     The compiler makes use of temporary files during the compilation of a
     source file; these temporary files are usually created in the direc-
     tory /var/tmp. Direct control over the location of the temporary files
     can be exercised by setting the environment variable TMPDIR to the
     appropriate directory path.  See man tempnam for further details.
 
FILES
     a.out               executable output file
 
 
 
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EPCF90(1)                  EPC (6 November 1996)                  EPCF90(1)
 
 
 
     file.a              library of object files
     file.c              C source file
     file.f              EPC Fortran-90 fixed format source file
     file.F              EPC Fortran-90 fixed format source file for C
                         preprocessor
     file.for            EPC Fortran-90 fixed format source file
     file.fv             EPC Fortran-90 fixed format source file
     file.ftn            EPC Fortran-90 fixed format source file
     file.f90            EPC Fortran-90 free format source file
     file.o              object file
     file.s              assembler source file
     file.S              assembler source for C preprocessor
     file.d              EPC Fortran-90 module dictionary file
     file.pc             EPC Fortran-90 program unit catalog file
     file.pcl            EPC Fortran-90 program unit catalog list file
     /opt/epc/epcf90/epctools/as
                         assembler
     /opt/epc/epcf90/epctools/libm.a
                         archive maths library
     /opt/epc/epcf90/epctools/crt1.o
                         start-up routine
     /opt/epc/epcf90/epctools/crti.o
                         start-up routine
     /opt/epc/epcf90/epctools/crtn.o
                         start-up routine
     /opt/epc/epcf90/epctools/mcrt1.o
                         profiling start-up routine
     /opt/epc/epcf90/epctools/values-Xt.o
                         ANSI conformance module
     /opt/epc/epcf90/epctools/values-Xc.o
                         ANSI conformance module
     /opt/epc/epcf90/epctools/values-Xa.o
                         ANSI conformance module
     /usr/include        directory searched by the EPC Fortran-90 INCLUDE
                         statement
     /usr/include/epcf90 3f include file and f90_kinds source file
     mon.out             file produced for analysis by prof(1)
     epcf90              the EPC Fortran-90 driver
     epcf90compiler      the EPC Fortran-90 compiler
     epcfcem             the EPC Fortran-90 compilation environment manager
     libIEPCF90.a        the EPC Fortran-90 I/O run-time library
     libKEPCF90.a        the EPC Fortran-90 array maths run-time library
     libMEPCF90.a        the EPC Fortran-90 maths run-time library
     libUEPCF90.a        the EPC Fortran-90 utility run-time library
     libVEPCF90.a        the EPC Fortran-90 Vax utility run-time library
     libCEPCF90.a        the EPC Fortran-90 -C90 I/O run-time library
     libp/libIEPCF90.a   the EPC Fortran-90 profiled I/O run-time library
     libp/libKEPCF90.a   the EPC Fortran-90 profiled array maths run-time
                         library
     libp/libMEPCF90.a   the EPC Fortran-90 profiled maths run-time library
     libp/libUEPCF90.a   the EPC Fortran-90 profiled utility run-time
                         library
 
 
 
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EPCF90(1)                  EPC (6 November 1996)                  EPCF90(1)
 
 
 
     libp/libVEPCF90.a   the EPC Fortran-90 profiled VAX utility run-time
                         library
     libp/libCEPCF90.a   the EPC Fortran-90 profiled -C90 I/O run-time
                         library
 
SEE ALSO
     EPC Fortran 90 User's Guide, (EPC, 1996); Fortran 90 Handbook (Inter-
     text, 1992)
 
DIAGNOSTICS
     The diagnostics generated by the EPC Fortran 90 compiler are intended
     to be self-explanatory.